Using Workflow Mapping to Improve the Recruitment Process in Clinical Trials

(Originally presented abstract at 2019 Annual Conference San Antonio)
Sara Sampaio MD, CCRP,*, Sepideh Saroukhani MD, MS, PhD candidate, Aryn Knight BS, CCRP, Jennifer L. Chambers RN, BSN, CCRC,
Emerson C. Perin MD, PhD, FA

Introduction

In this article, we describe the strategies and approaches developed at the Center for Clinical Research at Texas Heart Institute (THI) in Houston, Texas, to facilitate efficient participant recruitment for heart failure–related randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Randomized trials are typically complex in terms of the target population, protocol design, and intervention strategies — factors that can hinder the recruitment of a sufficient number of eligible participants. Thus, detailed upstream planning is crucial to guide recruitment efforts — especially in trials that focus on serious medical conditions such as heart failure — and a trained recruitment team is needed to execute protocol-specified tasks. Despite extensive literature on strategies for enhancing participant recruitment in research, little has been reported about the actual activities and experiences associated with recruitment and about the impact of organizational strategies on this work.

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Introducing Generation Z: Who Are They and How Will They Impact the Clinical Research Workplace?

Barbara van der Schalie, MS
Learning and Professional Development Manager  
Clinical Monitoring Research Program Directorate
Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute

Abstract: Generation Z, the postmillennials, are the latest addition to the extremely generationally-diverse American clinical research workplace. Their preferences for critical workplace parameters, including workplace engagement, communication, leadership approaches, and flexibility, differentiate them from even their most closely age-aligned colleagues, the millennials. This article describes the differences between and preferences of the generation and provides ways to optimize the integration of Generation Z into the current clinical research workplace.

Disclaimer: This project has been funded in whole or in part with federal funds from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, under Contract No. HHSN261200800001E. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

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Clinical Research Studies During the COVID-19 Pandemic Public Health Emergency

Corona Virus Molecule Rendering Public Health Crisis

Defining a “New Normal” in Clinical Research to Support the World’s 336,747 Research Studies

By: Jennifer Goldfarb – MSN, RN, CCRP

As of April 21, 2020, according to clinicaltrials.gov, there were 336,747 research studies registered by organizations in all 50 states and 210 countries throughout the world. Clinical Research is a delicate ecosystem within healthcare that can be easily advocated for as an essential healthcare service. It is a highly complex, intensely regulated and regimented, environment. It is a critical component of healthcare that drives scientific and medical advances to promote health and treat illness. This environment has suffered unprecedented disruption and chaos during this pandemic. While people hunker down in their homes, waiting for this storm to pass, clinical research conduct is being adapted, paused, and even discontinued, in every therapeutic area.

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Human Factors Testing and Clinical Research

Tim Reeves, CHFP
Founder and Managing Director
Human Factors MD

Abstract: Human factors simulated-use studies provide a valuable tool for evaluating the usability and safety of medical devices, including combination products such as inhalers, injection devices, and transdermal patches. Through human factors studies, researchers evaluate how users and devices perform in low-frequency high-risk situations that may not occur in controlled clinical trials. This article provides an overview of the role of human factors testing in combination product development as well as how human factors studies complement traditional clinical trials in establishing safety and efficiency in drugs and devices.

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FDA Continues to Support Transparency and Collaboration in Drug Approval Process as the Clinical Data Summary Pilot Concludes

FDA Drug Approval Process

U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Small Business and Industry Assistance (CDER SBIA).
As our society becomes more global, it has become increasingly clear that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration needs to take a more collaborative approach to our drug approval process. Today, drugs that are approved by the FDA to be marketed in the United States are developed both in and out of the United States.

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